Cooking

A new and easier way to make lemon curd, sorta.

There is a you-tube video, entitled lemon curd take 2, which shows how to make a lemon curd type product with your vitamix. It’s not really lemon curd as the texture is too frothy and light for true lemon curd, but boy is it much easier than the other lemon curd recipe you can find on my site. This video is made by Williams-Sonoma.

The recipe is as follows:
3 whole eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup Cubed Butter (sweet cream butter)
1 Tablespoon Grated Lemon Peel

Put the eggs, sugar and lemon juice into the vitamix. Start at variable one and increase to high. If you have the vitamix with the presets, use the hot soup setting. Blend/Cook for four minutes. At this point, add the cubed butter, one pat at a time, with the blender still going. Wait until each butter pat is fully incorporated until you put the next one in. Continue to blend for an additional minute to get the curd of the proper consistency. If your curd is not thick enough, you can continue to blend for another minute.

The video goes on to talk about making the cutest little tartlets with the newly made lemon curd. I prefer, however to eat mine with scones and cream.

So there is no question this is easier than the lemon curd recipe that I have elsewhere on this site. Why do I say it’s only sorta lemon curd? The texture is not right, it’s more like lemon chiffon. It’s fantastic, don’t get me wrong, but it’s not curd.

What do you do with all this lovely lemon curd, other than eat it out of hand? I made the most amazing ice cream with my donvier pint size ice cream maker. First I made a blueberry ice cream base and froze that with the ice cream maker. Then I took the ice cream maker and filled half of it with lemon curd and half with blueberry ice cream and spun. It was delicious. Too delicious.

What to do with all this yummy summer fruit.

This week has been good for making jams and other fruit preserves. I picked blueberries last weekend and am up to my eyeballs now in blueberry jam, blueberry pie filling, hedgerow jam and the like. While taking a break from the canning pot I came upon an old copy of HomeFarmer, for dreamers and realists. It’s a magazine from the UK which is really great for people like me who dream of living on their own homestead.

I found an article on old curd recipes in this edition and have decided that I would make some curds next. I have made orange curd in the past, and it was yummy. Unfortunately, my source of organic citrus has dried up so I need to find a new type of curd.

I found a recipe for mixed berry curd, which has possibilities. Here is that recipe:

Makes 3 small jars of curd.
500 grams of frozen mixed berries
2 eggs from your own free range happy hens
60 grams (that’s 2 oz) unsalted butter
200f (7 oz) caster sugar (I think this is powdered sugar)

Defrost the berries in a saucepan then warm them until they turn mushy.
Push the berries through a sieve unto a large heatproof bowl.
Add the butter and sugar to the sieved berries and balance the bowl over a saucepan of fast simmering water, bain-marie style. The base of the bowl must not touch the water. If you want a thick curd, cook the berries directly in the saucepan.
Stir until the butter and sugar have dissolved, then take off the heat and sieve in the egg, stiffing continuously until it is all mixed in.
Continue to warm over a medium heat, stirring continuously, when the curd starts to thicken. When the curd is thick, glossy and coats the back of a wooden spoon, it is ready. If you’ve been stirring for 30 minutes since adding the egg, then this is as thick as it gets.
Ladle into the jars, twist on the lids and leave to cool.
Place them in the fridge to thicken or keep them in a cool dark cupboard. Use within two months.

Just writing about homemade curd makes my mouth water. Homemade curd is sooooo good you’ll want to find a way to make your own double devonshire cream and scones and have a proper tea.

How do you can your curd? Some say you can’t (thanks USDA) but if you’re willing to take your life into your own hands, then you might want to can it. Believe me, once you’ve tasted the curd, you won’t mind thumbing your nose at the USDA.

Wash and sterilize your jars and lids. Never reuse the lids of your canning jars, but you can reuse the jars and the rings.
Ladle your hot curd into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Remove any trapped air bubbles with a clean plastic knife. Wipe the jar rims and threads with a clean, damp cloth. Cover with hot lids and apply rings. Process 4 ounce jars and half pint jars for 10 minutes at 11 pounds of pressure in a dial gauge pressure canner or a 10 pounds pressure in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.

Aunt J’s Lemon Curd (courtesy of Cooking Light):

1 cup + 2 Tbsp sugar

1 Tbsp cornstarch

1/8 tsp salt

1 cup fresh lemon juice

3 large eggs

2 tablespoons butter

1 teaspoon grated lemon rind

1) Combine the sugar, cornstarch and salt in medium saucepan.

2) Add juice and eggs. Bring mixture to a boil while whisking constantly.

3) Reduce heat and continue to stir until thickened, about 1 minute.

4) Remove pan from heat; add in butter and lemon rind, and stir until butter is melted.

5) Cover and chill in refrigerator until completely cooled and thickened.

Makes about 1.5 cups.

Approximate nutrition for 1 tbsp serving: 35 calories, 1 g fat, 6g carbs, 0.5 g protein

Blueberry Soda Syrup

Today I used up the last of my blueberries. Last weekend DH and I went and picked blueberries at a upick place. We had about 20 pounds of blueberries. The berries were getting old and I had made as much jam and blueberry pie filling as I could stand. I was looking for another thing to do with the blueberries. I still had frozen blueberries from last year, and my dehydrator is on the fritz.

Enter Alton Brown! He can always be counted upon to do something interesting with ingredients. I searched the food network site and found that years ago he made a blueberry soda. Just the thing, as I am still playing with my sodastream.

I took 2 quarts of fresh blueberries and 2 cups of water. I boiled them for 15 minutes until nearly all the blueberries had split. I then drained the fluid with my jelly strainer. I added 2 tablespoons of lime juice and 7 ounces of sugar and warmed up the fluid enough to dissolve the sugar.

Alton says that the blueberry syrup will last for months in the fridge. I don’t think it’s going to last that long. I added a quarter cup of syrup into 8 ounces of carbonated water and YUM!

Best use of blueberries yet!

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